Gambia:The stance of Adama Barrow on the coming elections isn’t clear.

English Language Lesson

STANCE and STANDS

STANCE: The word ‘stance’ is a noun (plural stances) which means ‘the manner, posture, or pose in which one stands.’

E g. The stance of Adama Barrow on the coming elections isn’t clear.

Pata PJ‘s stance showed he was ready to begin.

‘Stance’ also means ‘one’s opinion or point of view.’

E.g. I don’t agree with your stance on gun control.

STAND: The word ‘stand’ is a verb (stands, stood, stood, standing) which means (heading) to position or be positioned physically; (intransitive) to support oneself on the feet in an erect position; (intransitive) to rise to one’s feet; to stand up; (intransitive) to remain motionless.’

E.g. Here I stand, wondering what to do next.

Stand up, walk to the refrigerator, and get your own snack.

The third person singular form of the verb stand is ‘stands’. It sounds a little like ‘stance’ and thus the confusion of the two by many learners of English. Simply, remember that ‘stance’ is a noun whereas ‘stands’ is a verb.

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‘Stands’ may also be a noun when it refers to where people stand to watch a game, or wait for something.

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